New paper in Nature Plants

We have a new paper online showing aboveground biomass carbon fluxes in the global tropics using the SMOS L-VOD data. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41477-019-0478-9

New papers on the impact of changed rainfall patterns on savanna vegetation

Climate change includes not only changed rainfall amounts, but also the distribution, intensity and frequency of heavy rainfall events changes. This leads to a a generally decreased relationship between annual rainfall and vegetation production. Also, herbaceous and woody vegetation benefit differently from changed rainfall patterns. We have now 2 new studies online, exploring how changed … Continue reading New papers on the impact of changed rainfall patterns on savanna vegetation

Tree cover promoted in semi-arid Sahelian farms – new publication in Nature Geoscience

More people equal more trees in semi-arid West Africa - Our new study published in Nature Geoscience questions ‘received wisdom’ as concerns the relationship between human agency and woody vegetation of West Africa. We demonstrate that in low-rainfall areas woody cover is denser in cultivated areas than in savannas, and close to settlements rather that … Continue reading Tree cover promoted in semi-arid Sahelian farms – new publication in Nature Geoscience

A new tool to monitor aboveground vegetation carbon stocks: first application to the African continent

Our new study uses unprecedented data sources to measure vegetation carbon stock dynamics at continental scale. The study demonstrates that over the African continent, the net carbon balance is negative for 2010-2016, and that most of the carbon losses occurred in dryland savannahs. The results were published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution. The … Continue reading A new tool to monitor aboveground vegetation carbon stocks: first application to the African continent

How does conflict affect land use? New publication!

Population and Environment in the Middle East

In November 2015, me and a colleague (Michael Degerald, visit his blog here) asked the question: how is agriculture affected in the areas seized by the Islamic State (aka ISIS, ISIL, Da’esh)? We couldn’t find much information to answer our question, so we decided to investigate it ourselves.

At first we wanted to look at changes in productivity indicated by satellite measured greenness, but later we decided to go a step deeper and look at land use activity as an indicator of land abandonment (as I had done in a previous publication). As the project moved on, more people became interested, and eventually three more co-authors were added: Petter Pilesjö (Lund University), Martin Brandt and Alexander Prishcepov (both from Copenhagen University).

Together, we conducted a land use classification based on NDVI data from MODIS based on the seasonality of the land surface. We distinguished between single cropped cropland…

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